PACT will be offering some great items this year for the silent auction at the Kielbasa Cook Off on Saturday, Oct. 4, at St. Clements Community Center.  All items are Polish .  Amber pieces, Polish pottery, books about local Polish history, Polish beer, liqueurs, vodka, Polish t-shirts, amber cut wine glasses, Christmas pieces and much more will be available.  So come out to the cook off and enjoy some great kielbasa and check out our Polish items.

 


 

Presented with support from the Copernicus Program in Polish Studies.

This series of restored classic Polish films has been organized and curated by Martin Scorsese, one of the most recognized and respected filmmakers in the world, and is the largest presentation of restored Polish cinema to date.

9/8: The Last Day of Summer & Innocent Sorcerers
9/15: Night Train
9/22: A Short Film About Killing
9/29: Jump
10/6: The Illumination
10/13: The Saragossa Manuscript
10/20: Pharaoh
10/27: Mother Joan of the Angels
11/3: Ashes and Diamonds
11/10: The Hourglass Sanatorium
11/17: Austeria
11/24: Black Cross
12/1: The Promised Land
12/8: Man of Iron

Below are just three of the films being shown.

To see more, go to  http://www.michtheater.org/series/polish-cinema/

Night Train

Night Train

Monday, September 15 at 7 PM. Part of Martin Scorsese Presents: Masterpieces of Polish Cinema. Presented with support from the Copernicus Program in Polish Studies.

In Night Train (Pociag), directed by Jerzy Kawalerowicz, a subtle game of emotions between two travelers—changing from mutual aversion to closeness without hope of a future—plays out amidst the human microcosm of a night train. Jerzy (Leon Niemczyk) and Marta (Lucyna Winnicka), accidentally end up holding tickets for the same sleeping chamber on an overnight train to the Baltic Sea coast. Also on board is Marta’s spurned lover, who will not leave her alone. When the police enter the train in search of a murderer on the lam, rumors fly and everything seems to point toward one of the main characters as the culprit.

1959. 98 minutes. Polish with subtitles. 

A Short Film About Killing

A Short Film About Killing

Monday, September 22 at 7 PM. Part of Martin Scorsese Presents: Masterpieces of Polish CinemaPresented with support from the Copernicus Program in Polish Studies.

A Short Film About Killing (Krótki film o zabijaniu) opens with a scene of a dead rat and a lifeless cat hanging by the neck. As the plot unfolds, Yatzek (Miroslaw Baka) is a 20-year-old drifter who murders a testy taxi driver (Jan Tesarz) in a gut-wrenching scene of excessive violence. Tension continues to build as a newly licensed young attorney (Krzysztof Globisz is chosen to represent Yatzek in court. Much anticipated and well-received at Cannes, the film won the European Film Academy Award for “Best European Film” in 1988. ~ Rovi

1987. 86 minutes. Polish with subtitles.

Jump

Jump

Friday, September 29 at 7 PM. Part of Martin Scorsese Presents: Masterpieces of Polish Cinema.

Director: Tadeusz Konwicki.

One of Poland’s most important novelists, Tadeusz Konwicki was also a director (The Last Day of Summer) and screenwriter (Pharoah, Mother Joan of the Angels). Jump (Salto) is a tantalizing existential mystery that hops nimbly between allegory and black comedy. It begins with the hero (Cybulski) jumping off a moving train and making his way to a small town where he lived during the war. Or did he? Riffing on his Ashes and Diamonds persona, Cybulski delivers a dazzlingly protean performance. Is his character an imposter, a fugitive, a prophet, an avenger, a ghost, or just an ordinary schmuck? The title refers both to the hero’s initial leap and to a justly celebrated dance performed to composer Wojciech Kilar’s ultra-cool jazz theme. – Marty Rubin

1965. 105 minutes. Polish with English subtitles.


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Pictured: City Councilman Tom Winiewski, PACT President Stan Machosky,

Toledo Mayor Michael Collins and PACT Vice-President, Matt Zaleski.

From the Toledo Blade, Monday, August 11, 2014:

The second annual Polka Party Picnic offered far more than the expected polka dancing and kielbasa meal at St. Hyacinth Catholic Church on Sunday afternoon.

At the event, the Polish -American Community of Toledo, or PACT, announced plans to launch a $1million capital campaign to raise funds to establish a Toledo area Polish-American Community Center.

“A major issue is that the churches formed by some of the first Poles who came to Toledo are slowly closing”, said Toledo Polish Genealogical Society and PACT member Marge Stefanski.  “Many believe some of the Polish heritage in the community is being lost in the process.”

“We need to keep the heritage going by passing it on to the young crowd,” Stan Machosky, PACT Board President said. “We need a place to assemble to transfer this to the young.”

To read the entire article, go to http://www.toledoblade.com/Culture/2014/08/11/Poles-set-sights-on-1M-center.html

Thanks you to St. Hyacinth and St. Charles for giving PACT this venue to launch this campaign.  It is with the interest of the entire Polish population of Toledo and North West Ohio that this endeavor is being started.  DSCN1256

 


http://www.toledoblade.com/Culture/2014/08/11/Poles-set-sights-on-1M-center.html

In 2009, a group of Poles gathered at Ski’s Restaurant to address some of the needs of the local Polish community.   Like some of the other area ethnic groups in the Toledo area, the Poles were witness to a dying heritage, with their old Polish neighborhoods becoming blight-ridden and once popular churches closing.  Certainly the future looked bleak.

To address these issues and more, the group formed a new Polish organization — The Polish-American Community of Toledo (PACT).  Five years later a lot has changed for the Toledo Poles.

Along with spearheading a litany of events that call attention to the Polish heritage, PACT wants to build a much-needed Polish Community Center for the Toledo area.

“Leading up to this point, PACT has been able to successfully promote the Polish heritage with annual events like our Wagilia Celebration, Kielbasa Klassic Golf Tournament, annual scholarship competition, our Kielbasa Cook-off Competition, and more,” said Stan Machosky, President, PACT.  “But now we feel the time has come to try and fulfill a significant part of PACT’s mission — To build a Polish-American Community Center.

When PACT, a Non- Profit 501-C-3 organization, was created in 2009 it had a mission of supporting and furthering the cause of local Polish-American groups and to enhance the lives of local Polish-Americans.  PACT wanted its members to help promote, support, and patronize locally owned Polish-American businesses. PACT wants support for Polish-American business owners, and wanted its members to promote, join and support local and national groups and organizations that help promote events that perpetuate Polish culture and traditions.  But a key piece of that mission was the building of a Polish-American Community Center that would ultimately house a cultural center, library, youth recreation center, and provide a venue for local Polish American groups to hold their activities.

On Sunday August 10, PACT announced an ambitious capital campaign to raise $1 million to build the Polish-American Community Center.

“When Poles first came to Toledo and settled in their neighborhoods, they built churches that served the function of a Polish community center.  As Poles left those neighborhoods, the churches declined in attendance and eventually closed.  However the need for a Polish-American Community Center still exists to help promote the Polish heritage,” said Mr. Machosky.

To meet its financial goal, PACT plans a grassroots campaign to reach out to local Polish-Americans, and to seek grants and donations from area corporations.   In addition PACT plans an on-line fund raising effort with Indiegogo.

“We want a grassroots campaign to make all area Poles feel like they are part of this development.   We also like the idea of an on-line effort which gives us access to Poles and other Polish organizations around the world who may wish to contribute to our effort,” said Mr. Machosky.

PACT says it is hoping to work with a prominent local Pole — Lucas County Treasurer Wade Kapszukiewicz — to see what’s available through the Lucas County Land Bank for redevelopment.

Those wishing to make donations can send checks made payable to Polish-American Community of Toledo,  P.O. Box 1033,  Sylvania, OH  43560. They can also visit the Indiegogo.


 2014 Kielbasa Klassic Winners:  Marten Whalen, Justin Gorby, Joey Hewitt and Hamilton Hodges.

Winners of the 2014 Kielbasa Klassic Golf Scramble (out of 23 teams) were: Marten Whalen, Justin Gorby, Joey Heritt, and Hamilton Hodges.

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American Originals: Northwest Ohio’s Polish Community at Home, Work, Worship, and Play is the latest book to be published by the University of Toledo Press.

The 258 page work presents a glimpse into the history of one of Toledo’s most important ethnic groups.

“The book is a mix of the broader themes that have shaped our community with the actual lives that Polish-Americans recall–sometimes remembered with pain, more often with joy, and always with the respect for the accomplishments of the families, friends and neighbors,” said Timothy Borden, editor of the book.  “These are the histories of true American originals, who found a proper home for their ideals in the Polish-American community of northwest Ohio.”

The book includes several chapters by Borden, who holds a Ph.D. in history from Indiana University Bloomington.  Others with chapters include David Chelminski, Dorothy Stohl, Jane Armstrong-Hudiburg, Sarah Miller, William Samiec, and Margaret Zotkiewicz-Dramczyk.

Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur also contributed a chapter on the history of her Polish family, including the story of her father, Steve, who was known in the community as “Kappy.”  Kappy began his career as a trucker and produce dealer in the 1930’s, and in the 1950’s, he and his wife Anastasia, opened the Supreme Market in Rossford.  The market sold Polish specialty items.  Kaptur also recounts several trips she made to Poland to visit the homeland of her ancestors, and how moved she was by the Polish people and the tales of their struggles throughout history.

The book also looks at the artistic expressions of Toledo’s Polish community in its polka music.  The chapter by Zotkiewicz-Dramczyk looks at some of the beloved polka bands that played in many venues around Toledo.  It includes interviews with some of the bands’ leaders and discusses the evolution of Toledo’s polka music.  A listing of polka recordings by Toledo bands is also included.  In addition, Zotkiewicz-Dramczyk discusses the influential Toledo Polish music radio show hosted for years by Chet Zablocki, assisted by his wife Helen, and then after Helen’s death, by his second wife, Sharon.

Other chapters look at Polish wedding traditions, the role of local Catholic sisters in educating the new immigrants to Toledo, and the experience of those growing up in Toledo’s two Polish neighborhoods–Kuhschwantz and Lagrinka.  “American Originals  is an important contribution to Toledo’s history and is also a fascinating read for anyone who is a part of the Polish community, or just an admirer,” Barbara Floyd, director of the UT Press said.

The book is for sale from the UT Press website:  www.utoledopress.com, at Barnes & Noble at The University of Toledo, or by contacting Barbara Floyd, at 419-530-2170.

For more information about the book, or to schedule interviews with the authors, contact Floyd.

PACT 003 PACT

Congratulations to this year’s PACT/TPA scholarship winners!  They are:

College category:pietraz 2014 Blaczyzykwinner_nedit

Jessica Pietrasz

Jessica Pietrasz, age 18, of Rossford, Ohio who will be attending Youngstown State University this fall.  She is also the recipient of YSU’s Red & White Scholarship.  She is active in cross country, volleyball, basketball, track and student council.  Jessica will receive the Martin A. Blaszczyk scholarship.  It is awarded to the “best” submission as determined by the judges.  Martin A. Blaszczyk was the editor of the Lagrange Street News, a monthly newspaper that connected residents and former neighbors of its namesake Polish neighborhood with news, gossip, and community functions.  He helped to keep the Polish heritage alive in Toledo.

Rachel Perzynski, age 19, of Toledo.  Rachel will be attending DePaul University this fall.  She is also a DePaul University Presidential Scholarship winner and has maintained a cumulative 4.0 GPA for 4 years.  She is active in Speech and Debate, Migrant Ministry, SJJ Marching Band, dance, school plays and was secretary of the Enviro Club.

Casey Sobota, age 21, of Waterville, Ohio will be graduating from Ohio State University in 2016 with a major in Strategic Communications.  Casey is also the recipient of a Scarlet and Grey Scholarship, Anthony Wayne Generals Dispatch Editor Scholarship and a Transformational Program Grant that allowed her to study abroad in Eastern Europe.  She is a member of the Public Relation Student Society of American and a regular contributor to “Her Campus” online magazine.

High School category:

William DuPuis, age 14, of Toledo will be attending St. Francis de Sales High School this fall.  William is the brother of Joseph DuPuis, a 2013 PACT/TPA Scholarship winner.  William is also the recipient of a St. Francis  de Sales Scholarship, a GESU music award and he played on the GESU football team 2011-2013.

As in past years, Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur will award the scholarships to the winners in August.  Thank you to all who applied for these four scholarships.

 


PACT and Stanley’s Market are once again teaming up for the annual Kielbasa Klassic Golf Scramble.  This year, it will be held on Sunday, August 3rd, 2014 at the Giant Oak Golf Course on Lewis Avenue in Temperance Michigan.  The starting time is 10:00 AM.  The price for the scramble will be the same as in years past:  $75 per man or $300 per team.  This price includes golf, cart, food, beer and pop, team skins, door prizes, challenge holes and the famous “Kielbasa Klassic” t-shirt!  This year, there are 2 ways to register.  Just click here to sign up on the PACT site.  There you can choose to download the sign up sheet and fill it out and send it with your check to PACT, or go to Kielbasa Klassic’s website and sign up there online.  The deadline to enter is July 28th, 2014.  Proceeds from this event go to  the scholarship fund.  Please direct your  questions to Tim Paluszak at 419-410-6167.  Last year’s winners were: Dave Martin, John Danielski, Jim Carey and Tom Cunningham.

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The Fourth Annual Kielbasa Cook-Off hosted by The Polish-American Community of Toledo (PACT) raised an estimated $5,000 for PACT’s Capital Campaign to develop a Polish-American Community Center in the Toledo area.  At the same time, PACT also announced the start of  its on-line efforts — Indiegogo.com — to raise money for the  project.

 

Seven teams competed this year. Shawn Zaborski and his team of Polish Village Kielbasa, won the Kielbasa Cook-Off for the third year in a row.  They earned the title “Kielbasa King” a trophy, and a check for $300.   Second place went to Jeremy Pryba and his team Polska Pryba Kielbasa.  Mr. Pryba earned a check for $150 which he donated back to PACT and the capital campaign.  The third place finisher was Mike Hofner and his team of Dziadzia and Busia’s Old Fashion Recipe.  They earned $100 for their efforts.  Over 500 people attended the event held Saturday, October 4 at the St. Clement’s Community Center.

Polish Village Kielbasa and Polska Pryba tied for first in the celebrity cook off.  Tom Waniewski, Toledo city councilman, was the judge this year.


From Catholictraditions.org:

The origin of this miraculous image in Czestochowa, Poland is unknown for absolute certainty, but according to tradition the painting was a portrait of Our Lady done by St. John sometime after the Crucifixion of Our Lord and remained in the Holy Land until discovered by St. Helena of the Cross in the fourth century. The painting was taken to Constaninople, where St. Helena’s son, the Emperor Constantine, erected a church for its enthronement. This image was revered by the people of the city.

During  the siege by the Saracens, the invaders became frightened when the people carried the picture in a procession around the city; the infidels fled. Later, the image was  threatened with burning by an evil emperor, who had a wife, Irene, who saved it and hid it from harm. The image was in that city for 500 years, until it became part of some dowries, eventually being taken to Russia to a region that later became Poland.

After the portrait became the possession of the Polish prince, St. Ladislaus in the 15th century, it was installed in his castle. Tartar invaders besieged the castle and an enemy arrow pierced Our Lady’s image, inflicting a scar. Interestingly, repeated attempts to fix the image, artistically have all failed.

Tradition says that St. Ladislaus determined to save the image from repeated invasions, so he went to his birthplace, Opala, stopping for rest in Czestochowa; the image was brought nearby to Jasna Gora [“bright hill”] and placed in a small wooden church named for the Assumption. The following morning, after the picture was carefully placed in the wagon, the horses refused to move. St. Ladislaus understood this to be a sign from Heaven that the image should stay in Czestochowa; thus he replaced the painting in the Church of the Assumption, August 26, 1382, a day still observed as the Feast Day of the painting. The Saint wished to have the holiest of men guard the painting, so he assigned the church and the monastery to the Pauline Fathers, who have devoutly protected the image for the last six hundred years.

Having survived two attacks upon it, Our Lady’s image was next imperiled by the Hussites, followers of the heretic priest, John Hus from Prague. The Hussites did not accept papal authority as coming from Christ and taught that mortal sin deprived an office holder of his position, among other heresies. Hus had been influenced by John Wyclif and became infected with his errors. Hus was tried and condemned at Constance in 1415. The Hussites successfully stormed the Pauline monastery in 1430, plundering the sanctuary. Among the items stolen was the image. After putting it in their wagon, the Hussites went a little ways but then the horses refused to go any further. Recalling the former incident that was so similar, the heretics threw the portrait down to the ground, which shattered the image into three pieces. One of the plunderers drew his sword and slashed the image twice, causing two deep gashes; while attempting a third gash, he was overcome with a writhing agony and died.

The two slashes on the cheek of the Blessed Virgin, together with the one on the throat, not readily visible in our copy, have always reappeared after artistic attempts to fix them. The portrait again faced danger in 1655 by a Swedish horde of 12,000, which confronted the 300 men guarding the image. The band of 300 routed the 12,000 and the following year, the Holy Virgin was acclaimed Queen of Poland.

In September 14, 1920, when the Russian army assembled at the River Vistula, in preparation for invading Warsaw, the Polish people prayed to Our Lady. the next day was the Feast of Our Lady of Sorrows. The Russians quickly withdrew after the image appeared in the clouds over Warsaw. In Polish history, this is known as the Miracle of Vistula.

During the Nazi occupation of Poland in World War II, Hitler order all religious pilgrimages stopped. In a demonstration of love for Our Lady and their confidence in her protection, a half million Poles went to the sanctuary in defiance of Hitler’s orders. Following the liberation of Poland in 1945, a million and a half people expressed their gratitude to the Madonna by praying before this miraculous image.

Twenty-eight years after the Russian’s first attempt at capturing the city, they successfully took control of Warsaw and the entire nation in 1948. That year more than 800,000 brave Poles made a pilgrimage to the sanctuary at Czestochowa on the Feast of the Assumption, one of the three Feast days of the image; the pilgrims had to pass by the Communist soldiers who patrolled the streets.

Today, the Polish people continue to honor their beloved portrait of the Madonna and Child, especially on August 26, the day reserved by St. Ladislaus. Because of the dark pigment on Our Lady’s face and hands, the image is affectionately called the “Black Madonna,” most beautifully prefigured in the Bible, in the Canticle of Canticles, “I am black but beautiful.” The pigmentation is ascribed primarily to age and the need to keep it hidden for long periods of time in places where the only light was from candles, which colored the painting with smoke.

The miracles attributed to Our Lady of Czestochowa are many and most spectacular. The original accounts of them,  some of them cures, are archived by the Pauline Fathers at Jasna Gora.

Papal recognition of the miraculous image was made by Pope Clement XI in 1717. The crown given to the image was used in the first official coronation of the painting, which was stolen in 1909.

Pope Pius X replaced it with a gold one encrusted with jewels.czes2-1