If you weren’t at Wigilia celebration on Sunday, you will have to wait till Wigilia 2016 to experience a Polish Christmas eve.  The candle was lit at the sight of the first star, a meatless dinner was shared by all and kolendy was sung.  Thank you to all who attended this year’s Christmas Eve dinner and special thanks to Rev. Daniel Zak for reading the Christmas story, Stan Machosky for being MC, Gayle Sparagowski for preparing our wonderful meal, Ken Stein for being our mailman and passing out Oplatek to everyone and Jane Evans for donating the beautiful Nativity statues that were raffled off. The winner of the raffle were John and Sheryl Bibish.

See you again next year!


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WIGILIA 2015

The Polish name for Christmas Eve supper is “Wigilia” from Latin “Vigilare” – to await

95% of Polish families have preserved the Wigilia tradition and regard it as the high point of the Christmas season. We hope you can join us and make it a part of your Christmas tradition.

PACT is proud to announce that once again we will celebrate Christmas with the traditional Polish Wigilia Celebration.  This year’s Wigilia is scheduled for Sunday, December 13, 2015.  It will be held at Olivet Lutheran Church’s Christian Life Center, 5840 Monroe Street in Sylvania.  Wigilia begins at 5:30 PM.

THE WIGILIA CELEBRATION INCLUDES:

LIGHTING OF THE FIRST CANDLE

SHARING OF OPLATEK

MEATLESS MEAL OF TRADITIONAL POLISH FOODS

EXPLANATION OF WIGILIA TRADITIONS

SINGING TRADITIONAL POLISH CHRISTMAS CAROLS (KOLEDY)

READING THE PASSAGE OF THE BIRTH OF CHRIST

Price: $15.00 PACT members, $20.00 non-members,

$10 children 12 and under, children under five: free

Reserve your seat today by calling Tim Paluszak at 419-410-6167

 


Follow the Footsteps of St. John Paul II.

Pope John Paul

Sept. 6 – 16, 2016

Krakow, Wadowice, Auschwitz, Czestochowa, Zakupani, and Wieliczka!

**9 nights in Krakow’s City Center near Medieval Market Square

**Evening spent strolling Krakow Old Town (a UNESCO Heritage site):

St. Mary Church, Sukiennice Cloth Hall, Florianska Gate, famed Jewish Kazimierz district, Old Town’s defensive walls and the Barbican, Wawel Castle Cathedral, buriel site of St. Stanislaus, Patron Saint of Poland

**St. John Paul II Tour (Known as the “Catholic Tour”.  Following in the Footsteps of St. John Paul II, Visiting Wadowice, His birthplace and where he was baptized.

**Jasna Gora Monastery, the most famous Shrine in Poland and location of the Black Madonn a of Czestochowa.

**Experience Auschwitz and Birkenau Concentration Camp and Museum (commemorating the lives of those who died during the Holocaust of World War II.  Visit the cell which housed St. Maximilian Kolbe.

**Tour the legendary Wieliczka Salt Mine.  View Alterpieces, monument and religious icons carved by the faith-filled miners.

**Zakopani and the Tatra Mountains, a favorite respite of St. John Paul II.

Pilgrimage Excursion Price–$3,578

Please call Chris Dougherty for additional information.  419-345-2512

cdougherty@PinnacleTourExperience.com

www.pinnacletourexperience.com

 

 


October Polish heritage

Show your pride in your Polish Heritage!  The month of October is a good time to learn something new about Poland,  the country of your ancestors.  Here are a few suggestions for things you can do:

1. Start your family tree and invite all the members of your family to get involved.

2. Review a map of Poland and learn more about the town or city of your ancestors.

3. Read a book on Polish history and share that information with family and friends.

4. Attend a Polish American event and invite others to attend with you.

5. Display a Polish and American flag, a red and white bow, or a Heritage Month poster in your home or place of business.

6. Learn more about Polish customs and share that information with others.

7. Join a Polish American organization and get involved in some way.

There are many Polish American groups in Toledo that you can join.  PACT is sponsoring a pierogi class this month and also celebrates Wigilia in December.  These are two very important parts of Polish heritage that you may want to learn.  In any event, enjoy Polish Heritage month with your Polish family and friends!


Dust off your aprons and get ready to make some pierogi. PACT is taking reservations for the next pierogi class that will be held on Saturday, October 17th in the kitchen of Olivet Lutheran Church’s Christian Life Center. The fee is $30 per guest/ $25 for returning guests who already have the equipment from the last class. The fee includes pierogi recipes, hands on instructions, all ingredients to make your own dough, a cookie cutter and dough press, fillings for the pierogi, and your own pierogi to take home. Call Sherry to reserve your spot in the kitchen. 419-476-1171 (home) or 419-260-1970 (cell). All are welcome. You do not have to be a PACT member to attend. Don’t forget your apron and rolling pin! Smacznego! Call early as space is limited.P1010819 P1010803


PRCUA Hall – Saturday, October 3, 2015

5255 N. Detroit Avenue, Toledo, Ohio 43612

3:00 pm to 8:00 pm

Dinner: 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Ticket Price:  $30

Ticket price includes:  Pig Roast, Kielbasa, Homemade sides, Can Beer, and a chance each at:

LCP, The Judge, 870 Shotgun, 9mm, AR15

Contact:  Joel: 419-349-0634

Butch:  419-729-9680

David:  419-392-6947

Open to the public

Only 250 Tickets Available


This year’s golf scramble, held at Giant Oaks Golf Course, had the most competitors in the golf scramble’s history.  One hundred and eight golfers (27 4-man teams) competed for the winning spot.  This year’s winners were: George Polcyn, Steve Spencer, Tim McQuire and Chris Monroe.  They each received a cash prize of $300 and $200 in gift certificates to Stanley’s Market.  PACT member, Ed Lepiarz had a hole in one on the 15th hole, a par 3.

 

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2015 winners:  Tim McQuire, Steve Spencer,Chris Monroe,

and standing in for George Polcyn is Betty Osenbaugh, PACT board member.

 

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Ed Lepiarz had a hole-in-one on the 15th hole.

 

 


Jestem Polski

 

Throughout the existence of Poland, the contributions made to the betterment of mankind is innumerable, and I am glad I can say “Jestem Polski”.  To me, being Polish-American includes three pillars that should be practiced by all patriotic Poles, the first of which being the practicing of Polish culture and traditions.  Being Polish-American also means studying the academia and works of art and literature born out of the heart of Central Europe, Poland.  Finally, a large part of having a Polish heritage is Catholic faith.  To me, being Polish means to be cultured, to be studious, and to be religious.

To me my Polish tradition means implementing Polish culture into my life.  one of the ways I do this is by enriching my vocabulary with that of the Polish language, whether it be in song, or conversation.  Implementing the culture of Poland also means to celebrate holidays as a Polish-American.  This means having Polish food and drink, and celebrating in a Polish way, by following the customs and traditions of Poland.  Being Polish also means studying the humanities of Poland.  I do this by reading the likes of Adam Mickiewicz and his poetry, of Leszek Kolakowski critiques of Marx.  Studying Poland’s humanities is also understanding the history of Poland, seeing the art of Poland, and hearing the compositions of those such as Fryderyk Chopin.  As said by Kolakowski, “We learn history not in order to know how to behave or how to succeed, but to know who we are.”  Finally being Polish to me means to live out my Catholic faith.  I do this by being a lector for my parish and helping with mass.  I also help by volunteering in my church community, and helping the less fortunate.  All of these things are what it means to be Polish.

I am Polish by my traditions, I am Polish by my education, and finally, I am Polish by my faith.  I live out my heritage through the holidays I celebrate, the food I eat, and the words I speak.  I am living my Polish heritage by the works I read, the art I see, and the music I hear.  Finally my heritage is my Catholic faith, which has been and integral part of Poland since the 10th century.  In conclusion, being Polish is embracing the culture, the humanities, and the faith of Poland.


I wrote an essay last year telling you about my pride in being Polish but I did not win a scholarship.  I was proud of what I wrote, so I am sending it again.  This time, I am adding a few things.  I am leaving for boot camp in a few days.  I will do boot camp this summer and then return to do my senior year at Central Catholic.  My grandfather joined the Marines right out of high school when he was 17.  I am 17 and I am now a member of the Army National Guard.  They called my grandpa “Ski” like they did for most Polish guys in the service.  Because my last name is Collins, I am a little bit bummed that no one will call me “Ski”.  But, I will make sure that people know I am half Polish.

Although my name is Collins, my mother’s maiden name is Kwiatkowski and I consider myself to be Polish.  My mother, Connie, is the daughter of Caroline (Kasper) and the late John Kwiatkowski.  Whenever we celebrate anything, we begin with a prayer.  At holidays, we share Oplatki and eat kielbasa, pierogi, placek and kapusta.  At birthdays, we sing Happy Birthday followed by Sto Lat.

My grandmother is first generation American since her dad Stanislaus Kasper was born in Poland in 1907 in Lwow.  His father left Poland ahead of the rest of the family to find a job and settle in Huntington, Indiana.  There were 14 children in his family but many of them died while babies.  Only five of them lived to be adults.  He moved to Toledo to marry my great grandmother, Albina Ciacuch.

My great, great grandfather bought land in Huntington, Indiana and he felt so happy to be in America that he wanted to share his good fortune.  They grew their own food and canned and they fed any beggars that came to their house.  I think that helping others and sharing what we have comes from being Polish.  We are generous and hardworking people.  I belong to St. Pius X Church in Toledo.  My family and I help out with scouts, fish fries, and we help to feed the homeless doing outreach to the community.

Our family takes pride in being Polish and we value hard work and dedication to our Church and community.  My great Uncle John Kasper is an Oblate of St. Fancis and my great Aunt Sister Mary Ann Kasper is a nun in the Servants of Jesus order.  My great Aunt Pat Urbaniak is a church organist and my grandmother works at Lourdes University.

I attend Central Catholic and I will be a senior at the start of next year.  I play many sports, including cross country, track and soccer.  I volunteer at Hospice of Northwest Ohio and help my mom with feeding the homeless every month.  This scholarship will be beneficial to both my family and me because my family is light on money and the scholarship would take some of the stress off my hard working parents.  I am proud to be Polish because they encourage hard work and charity to others and I do too.

I hope you consider me for this scholarship but if not, I will still continue to be proud of my heritage.